The 11 toughest tee times in America

It’s hard enough to get to Fishers Island. It is almost impossible to play.

LC Lambrecht

The courses at the end of the US Top 100 vary in their difficulty, and we do not mean that it takes time to go around them. We are talking about ease of access – organizations that are not easy because they are unique. With that in mind – and with our latest Top 100 as an excuse to revisit this list – here’s a ranking in the rankings, spotlighting 11 courses which is most difficult to obtain.

Augusta National, Augusta, Ga.

Hello, friend. Please enjoy our post with minimal commercial impact. Marvel at the blushing colors of magnolia and dogwoods as you bask in the soothing trill of birds. By Sunday evening, you’ll swear you know every nook and cranny of Alister MacKenzie’s most famous course, which is good, because unless your Peyton Manning fandom has taken over Friend, play yourself unlike in cards. (Ranked 7th on GOLF’s Top 100 Courses in America)

Chicago Golf Club, Wheaton, Ill.

One of five members of the United States Golf Association, which was founded in 1894, Chicago Golf Club has been around long enough to attract a ton of members. It only has a few hundred. And someone should be with you when you play. (Ranked 13th on GOLF’s Top 100 Courses in America)

Crystal Downs Country Club, Frankfort, Mich.

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When architecture buffs start geeking out about the State-side masterpieces of Alister MacKenzie, they are sure to come to the northern Michigan treasure, which does not have the beautiful coast of Cypress Point and the organization has fame of Augusta National, but yes, in many ways. two eyes, each is the same as both. (Ranked 20th on GOLF’s Top 100 Courses in America)

Crystal Downs Country Club in Frankfort, Mich.

Patrick Koenig

Cypress Point Golf Club, Monterey, Calif.

“One year they had a big membership at Cypress,” Bob Hope once said of the club he belonged to. “They removed 40 members.” What remains today is a list of some 250 people who are ready to enter the coastal area that can pass for the National Park. (Ranked 2nd on GOLF’s Top 100 Courses in America)

Garden City Golf Club, Garden City, NY

What is the name? Home to the best Devereux Emmet designs, the hush-hush club was originally called the Garden City Men’s Club, a name that excluded roughly half of the human population. Today, women are given very few restrictions. The same applies to the rest of us. (Ranked 28th on GOLF’s Top 100 Courses in America)

Garden City Golf Club in Garden City, NY

Patrick Koenig

Fishers Island Club, Fishers Island, NY

An island in fact and metaphor, the Seth Raynor creation sits in the Atlantic, just off the east side of Long Island, accessible only by boat or private plane and beyond the average number of employees. The money here is old and quiet. In 1979, when GOLF included Fishers Island in its first tournament of the world’s greatest courses, a representative of the club wrote a letter to the editor: thank you kudos, he read. Now, please remove us from your list. (Ranked 9th on GOLF’s Top 100 Courses in America)

Nanea Golf Club, The Big Island, Hawaii

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Nanea is not Hawaiian for “business nunya.” But it will also be good. Designed by Charles Schwab and retail giant George Roberts, this luxe club has been described as tropical Augusta, a reference to the way it is not advertised while serving as a palm-fringed oasis. for the rich and their lucky friends. (Ranked 91st on GOLF’s Top 100 Courses in America)

Nanea Golf Club in Hawaii.

Karl Mackie

Ohoopee Match Club, Cobbtown, Ga.

At this remote hideaway, designed by Gil Hanse and Jim Wager for tech investor Michael Walrath, par means so little that it’s not even listed in the scoreboard. All that matters is how you attack your opponent. Okay, it’s important that you know a member. There are less than 100, and Ohoopee does not allow random games. (Ranked 39th on GOLF’s Top 100 Courses in America)

Pine Valley Golf Club, Pine Valley, NJ

Since everyone has access to information these days, let’s run some numbers. Pine Valley is the top course in the world, so everyone wants to play it. Too bad most of its members don’t live in the area, and visitors are not allowed. Add to that the fact that the club does not have regular fundraisers or participate in retreats (a way to enter other special education programs), and the math is hard for you. (Ranked 1st on GOLF’s Top 100 Courses in America)

Pine Valley Golf Club in Pine Valley, NJ

LC Lambrecht

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Seminole Golf Club, Juno Beach, Fla.

To get a sense of Seminole life, picture your typical gated Florida golf community, with an ostentatious clubhouse, gaudy-moneyed members and geezers riding bicycles everywhere you turn. Now imagine the opposite. “If I were a young pro, I would try to get Seminole,” Ben Hogan once said of this Donald Ross model. Audio instructions. Then again, Hogan gives a lot of advice that is easier said than done. (Ranked 21st on GOLF’s Top 100 Courses in America)

Sand Hills Golf Club, Mullen, Neb.

Drive deep into the corn fields of Nebraska, then drive a little farther, and a little farther, until the terrain turns into a heaving dunescape. When you arrive at the grounds of this private club, home to the Bill Coore-Ben Crenshaw stunner that this year rose before Augusta National in the rankings, you will realize your mistake: everyone comes arrived by private plane. (Ranked 6th on GOLF’s Top 100 Courses in America)

josh

Josh Sens

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Golf, food and travel writer, Josh Sens has been a contributor to GOLF Magazine since 2004 and now contributes across all of GOLF’s platforms. His work has been anthologized in The Best of American Sports. He is also the author, with Sammy Hagar, of Can’t We Have Fun: A Cookbook and Healthy Eating.

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